An Evening with Chris Hadfield

An Evening with Chris Hadfield

On Thursday evening, I was potentially the most excited I have ever been. A friend had texted me on the Monday night saying she had found 2 tickets to An Evening with Chris Hadfield in Usher Hall through in Edinburgh. My seat was in the back row and honestly it didn’t matter. I spent the whole 90 minutes in complete awe of Chris Hadfield, to the point that I wrote 4 pages of notes down.

His lecture talked about his ambition to be an astronaut, to his thought process pre launch of Atlantis, to that Space Oddity cover, to global warming. At the end was a Q&A, one boy asked if the watch he was wearing was the space watch. Without skipping a beat Chris invited the boy to have a look, much to the boys shock. It was such a genuine response, that echoes what I have seen in countless interviews and read in his book.

The shuttles themselves were designed in the late 60s, with computer design gaining momentum in the late 70s. So consider this, the computer memory and display of the whole ship, was 128K. Which is roughly the same size of 1 JPEG image.

Throughout the whole mission, the astronauts are constantly asking themselves What’s the next thing that’s going to kill us. Admittedly crude, but honest. Chris said the 30s ago was history, but 10 mins was in the future so you had to think about the now.

Chris was unsurprisingly an incredibly motivating speaker who did make you think. Impossible things happen, look at the moon landing or the space station, 50 years ago would have been impossible. He asked the audience to consider what perfection would look like in your life. If everything went perfect, where would you be in 10 years. He then advised us to use this thought to help you choose what to do next. Do things that drag you in the direction of the dreams. His quote of Reaching the absolute limit of your potential is going to stay with my for a long time.

An Evening with Chris Hadfield

An Evening with Chris Hadfield

Chris has managed to become a very famous astronaut, as well as a pretty cool science teacher. He did countless experiments in space for CSA ASC and NASA but also did much simpler experiments to show how everything as we know it changes when faced with 0 gravity.

Surface tension in action right there!

The Sky is Not the Limit